Sandy Warner

Teaching with technology


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Celebrating Our Passion Projects!

255005_origWow what an amazing night!

We celebrated the completion of our Passion Projects with A Presentation Night for the parents , grandparents and mentors to see the projects the students have been working on throughout the term.
I was completely overwhelmed by the number of families that came to our night. Altogether we had over 50 adults including parents, grandparents and/or mentors and 39 children attending.
We all squeezed into our classroom so that I could introduce the format for the evening and to thank the 16 mentors for donating their time and energy to help mentor the students. The students had made beautiful thank you cards and each mentor received a small block of chocolate as well.
The students then took their parents back to their station, which had been set up earlier, either in the library or in one of the rooms in our classroom block as we couldn’t all fit in our classroom!
After the students had presented their project to the parents I rang the bell to let them now it was time to visit another students presentation. The transition from one to the next ran smoothly and I was really happy that the adults ensured no student was left without an adult to present to.

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The last part of the evening was less formal and it gave the adults the opportunity to walk around and look at all the individual projects. The adults and all the children had great big smiles on their faces and you could see how proud they were!
All the feedback was very positive and the students were very proud of their work. I encourage you to visit our website Mrs Warners Passion Projects and go to the student blogs to read their reflections of the night and the Celebration Blog to view more photos too! A big thank you to my colleague Bu Cathy who worked behind the scenes all night and took the lovely photos for me too!
It was a very exciting and rewarding night and one which I am sure the students will look back on with fond memories. I know I will!


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Student engagement in our Passion Projects!

This term the students in my class have been participating in their own individualised Passion Projects. I was inspired to try this in my classroom after attending the EduTech 2014  Conference in Brisbane earlier this year and heard about Google’s Genius Hour where;


Each week, employees can take a Genius Hour — 60 minutes to work on new ideas or master new skills. They’ve used that precious sliver of autonomy well, coming up with a range of innovations…


I shared  a video of some students sharing what they thought about participating in Genius Hour to inspire us. I then used a sharing circle to spark their own passions. This helped them to get started in their thinking about what they would like to learn or create during their Passion Projects.

I was really keen to develop my students skills in self reflection of their own learning and so I also set up a website titled Mrs Warners Passion Projects solely for my students to do a weekly post on their own blog page to reflect on what they did each week, how they went and what did they need to do next. I then went over the guidelines with the students so they were clear about my expectations throughout the project.

We then used postie notes for the children to refine and finalise their big question for their Passion Project. For some of the students this was really easy whilst others had trouble committing to one thing and kept changing their minds! But we got there. I was amazed at the variety of topics the students have picked to either teach themselves or create.Some of the topics the students chose included;

  • sewing a surfboard cushion
  • creating an online video game
  • growing a garden
  • researching about wombats
  • learning to draw or paint better
  • learning how to play the drums or xylophone
  • making a cardboard arcade game
  • researching gravity and space
  • creating art with recycled sea glass
  • making a battery out of a $2 coin
  • conducting science experiments
  • investigate how volcanoes erupt
  • make a wooden droid
  • investigate how stuff gets popular so quickly
  • learn how to cook
  • create a lego stop motion movie
  • create decorative cupcakes
  • research how tornadoes are formed
  • learn how to do a hip hop dance

I was a bit overwhelmed too – how would I manage all my students doing different things? The reality was I couldn’t and shouldn’t have to if they are engaged. Fingers were crossed!

Once the students had decided on a topic, they then had to do some initial thinking and planning about what they were going to need and what the end product or goal will look like. I wanted the children to have in their mind how the were going to present what they did to the class and to their parents, a bit like the Backward by Design method. So the students completed an A3 planning sheet (see below) to help them do this.

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I also asked the students to help each other think of some people that might be able to help, guide and support them throughout their project, a bit like a mentor role. Once they choose their mentor they helped me construct a generic letter asking their mentors if they would like to help them. The students were delighted when we got three acceptances almost immediately!  We also wrote a letter to our parents explaining what our Passion Projects were and asked them to help their child gather some supplies during the holidays.

Each week students were given one hour to work on their passion project.We were really lucky to have 16 adults donate their time each week to become mentors for the students in my class. These ranged from parents and other teachers from within the school, to older teenage sisters and family friends to grandparents and local business owners. It was truly an amazing experience to watch everyone work collaboratively together. The students were totally engaged and become more responsible for their own learning.

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Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 8.19.26 AMThe Passion Projects provided the students an opportunity to work on something they were truly passionate about and while the end product was their main focus, it was the 21st century skills that they acquired and developed throughout the term that excited me as a teacher. I kept reminding them that failure was always an option but giving up was not and this became a mantra for most of my students. They were able to recognise problems when they got stuck and were able to problem solve to correct and improve their work. Initially some struggled to manage their time well but often they were able to reflect on this and work harder next time.

The students wanted to come to school in the morning and work on their passion projects before school started and I had students ask if they could work on them during our activity time. I even had students ask me if I had yard duty and if I didn’t, they would plead with me to open my class recess or lunch times so they could work on their projects!

In the final weeks of the term, the students were given a Passion Projects Rubric to do their own self assessment on their learning throughout the term. They also had to present their projects to their peers in their classrooms and each developed a speech for this. This was a great experience for the students as they were very proud of their projects and their work was acknowledged with rounds of applause from their classmates. It also provided them an opportunity to practice presenting their work, ready for our Celebration night to the parents and community in the last week of the term. You can read more about our presentation night here.

Overall I was thrilled with the student engagement of the students throughout the term and I will definitely do the Passion Projects again. The students in my class gave positive feedback on their experiences and most have already started planning what they will work on next term!